RGB


RGB
RGB
RGB
RGB
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RGB

The notion of an object possessing a supernatural power has been around since the start of history. From pagan rituals and amulets to political control over rare minerals, people have recognised unsubstantiated possibilities in things unknown, foreign and rare. The idea of magical properties associated with objects often change as we learn more about them, eventually redefining the object as a material or a tool, which acquires a technological role in our lives. They go through transitions, giving us a new perspective on the same object each time. RGB serves both as a set of room dividers or a set of optical filters, and stands somewhere between myth and science, dividing a room into two possible states, a dual reality. It borrows its shape from an enlarged microscopic slide and depicts a close-up version of RGB colour mode using three ancient mineral pigments; cinnabar, malachite and azurite. Each of these pigments, like many others, are made from rare minerals once considered magical or sacred and the paintings made with these pigments are thought to be of special significance. RGB merges the conditions of communication, from ancient paintings to our modern obsession towards monitors and displays, and provide a connection through the literal translation of the term RGB; Both a name for a technology and an acronym of three colours.
It's a triptych made with ancient colours, depicting a modern triptych we see and use everyday.

RGB was a contribution to the exhibition, Image for a Title: Placebo effects in the cultural landscape.